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Jam Shed Part 2: The Rebrand

Updated: Mar 9, 2020


Forming the desired identity of Jam Shed Using Lego Serious Slay, my team and I attempted to create an artefact that would represent Jam Shed's current positioning.


Lego Serious Play: Jam Shed's Current Brand Positioning


We then moved on to building a new artefact, that would aim to emulate our desired brand positioning for the wine.

Lego Serious Play: Desired Brand Positioning

Our second mock up featured a much more diverse set of characters - to represent how we would broaden the target audience to include men and women of various ages. We aim to retain the wine's the versatility, and whilst we kept the "jammy-ness" it is no longer the centre column. It is a feature rather than a centre-piece. The pink blocks representing fun, family and friends, have been moved to the foreground - as this is a core value that we feel needs to be concentrated on.

Lego Serious Play: Desired Brand Positioning 2

We then did a mood board to represent some of the ideas that we feel are important to jam shed.


Mood Board: Representing Jam Shed's Core Values

Understanding the Target Audience It is always important to try to understand the Target Audience (TA) when developing a new product or new design (Borja de Mozota, and Design Management Institute, 2003) In order to better understand the new target audience, and what they look for in a wine brand, two focus groups were held and a survey was conducted. As Ambrose (2015) states a sample should be as representative as possible of the overall population of the study. The individuals chosen for the survey and focus groups were within the age range of 20-35,thus fitting our target group. The female participants of the study found Jam Shed's branding to be tacky, and many asserted that they don’t drink red wine, with white wine being their favourite, followed by rosé. The vast majority of male participants strongly disliked the branding, although they claimed that when they drink wine they tend to go for red. It was clear that Jam Shed were missing out on a huge opportunity – most new wine drinkers tend to go for white wine. Their second favourite after white being rosé.




Extending the brand One thing that Jam Shed got correctly is that new wine drinkers prefer sweet wine, with this knowledge it seems logical to extend the brand to include a white and rosé wines.

Research shows that extending a brand can reinforce consumer knowledge of the brand as well as enhance its image. Extending a brand can also convey broader brand meaning to customers. We want our TA to see Jam Shed as the go-to wine for every occasion. As not all wine drinkers go for red wine, it makes perfect sense to extend the brand to include multiple grape varieties. (Keller and Sood, 2003)



Change #2: Extend the brand to include more grape varieties.



Value Proposition Canvas Using the Value Proposition Canvas, I came up with a few words that I feel truly represent Jam Shed. These are : fun, approachable, sweet taste suitable for everyone and versatile.


Value Proposition Canvas: The Customer Profile

Value Proposition Canvas: The Value Map

Change #3: Desired identity for Jam shed:

  • fun, quirky and approachable

  • great for friends, family and everyone in between

  • easy to choose and versatile, with a great jammy taste suitable for everyone


References


Ambrose, G., (2015) Design thinking for visual communication Second.


Borja de Mozota, B. and Design Management Institute, (2003) Design management : using design to build brand value and corporate innovation, New York : Garsington: Allworth / Design Management Institute pp. 81-113.


Jam Shed (2019) Jam Shed wine. Available at: https://www.facebook.com/JamShedWine/photos/a.2144046765701877/2340191046087447/?type=3&theater (Accessed: 1 February 2020).


Keller, K.L and Sood, S. (2003) ‘Brand Equity Dilution’. MIT Sloan Management Review, 45(1), pp. 12-15.

Wheeler, A., (2018) Designing brand identity : an essential guide for the whole branding team Fifth.



Neumeier, M., (2006) The brand gap : how to bridge the distance between business strategy and design : a whiteboard overview Rev., Berkeley, Calif. : London: New Riders ; Pearson Education.

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